Rose Water

Rose Water has a rich history!

Rose water is just as simple as it sounds: it’s water distilled with pesticide-free rose petals to extract their essence. They gently boil the flower petals in purified water, and then they capture and condense the heavily-scented steam. This produces a highly fragrant liquid with a subtle floral flavor.

Because of it’s use in Persian and Indian foods and pastries, many people think of rose water as exotic and unusual, but that wasn’t always the case! Before vanilla extract became accessible and affordable in the United States, rose water was as ubiquitous in Colonial American baked goods as vanilla is today! In fact, when vanilla extract was first becoming popular with American bakers, it was basically used as a fancy, exotic substitute for rose water! Crazy right?

Al Wadi Al Akhdar Rose Water

The rose water we carry at Whisk comes from Al Wadi Al Akhdar. They’ve been a leading Lebanese food brand throughout the world since 1979. They combine traditional and exotic touches with the latest food technology to bring high-quality authentic ingredients to the global market. They focus on traditional Lebanese & Middle Eastern specialties, and their flower essences are known to be some of the finest on the market.

Uses for Rose Water

Rose water can be a surprise to people who have never tried it before. The scent is highly floral and perfume-y, like walking through a rose garden in full bloom! The flavor is pleasantly bitter and reinforces the floral notes in ingredients like cinnamon, cardamom, honey, or pistachios.

While traditionally used to add a subtle fragrance to sweets, pastries, and some savory dishes; rose water also lends itself perfectly to use in craft cocktails as well. Used sparingly, rose water can give your recipes an elegant otherworldly quality, but be careful not to add too much! A few extra drops can take your recipe from delicate, subtle, and refined, to a big musty ol’ swig from Grandma’s perfume bottle. It’s best to start with a quarter teaspoon or so in your recipes, and then taste before deciding if you’d like to go any further.

Rose water is an incredibly versatile addition to both your pantry and your bar cart. Once you start experimenting with adding it to your favorite recipes, you won’t be able to stop! If you’re still unsure how you could use it yourself at home, please watch the video cocktail recipe below for a little inspiration!


The Jam-Hattan

2 oz good rye whiskey
1 oz sweet vermouth
1 tablespoon cherry jam
2 to 3 dashes aromatic bitters
1/4 teaspoon rose water
1 or 2 Luxardo maraschino cherries, if desired

Combine the whiskey, vermouth, jam, bitters, and rose water in a cocktail shaker with plenty of ice. Be careful not to add too much rosewater or it can overpower the drink.

Shake shake shake the cocktail until the shaker is ice cold and frosty on the outside, a good minute or so. Strain over ice into a rocks glass. Double strain to remove all the fruit solids from the jam if desired. Garnish with Luxardo maraschino cherries.

Bottoms up!

Fee Brothers Celery Bitters

Fee Brothers’ History:

In 1864, James Fee opened a grocery and liquor store in Rochester, NY to help support his large, close-knit family. His brothers helped him grow the store into a successful winery and wine import business. The name was changed from James Fee & Company to Fee Brothers in 1883.

Surviving Prohibition: 

When prohibition began in 1920, Fee Brothers kept themselves afloat by making altar wine & distributing wine-making supplies. They even consulted with homeowners to legally make their own wine at home. It was legal to make a small amount of wine for personal use, but making and selling stronger spirits was strictly forbidden.

That didn’t stop people from trying though, and poor quality alcohol flooded the market. Most of the people making this black market booze had no clue what they were doing. For that reason, most of the alcohol being sold in saloons and speakeasies tasted terrible. Fee Brothers saw this as an opportunity and developed a line of cordial syrups and drink flavorings. They designed them to make inferior spirits taste like the real thing. Benedictine, Chartreuse, Brandy, and Rum flavorings were among their most popular products.

Cocktail Bitters:

When prohibition ended in 1933, Fee Brothers started selling liquor again. They kept making their cordial syrups though, and they remained very popular. Therefore, they soon decided to focus on mixers, syrups, and flavorings instead. By 1950 they were on a never-ending quest to develop new products and their flavored cocktail bitters line really became a focus. Fee Brothers’ product list now boasts almost 100 drink mix products. Today they’re best know for their huge selection of flavored cocktail bitters.

Celery Bitters:

Celery bitters have actually been around since the 19th century. However, They’ve never been quite as popular as more traditional flavors like aromatic or orange bitters. They do have their place in the bar though, especially now that savory cocktails like bloody marys and picklebacks are so popular. Thankfully, Fee Brothers offers a tasty and affordable option for savory cocktail lovers. These bitters add a celery-forward flavor with herbaceous notes and a distinctive savoriness. They’re perfect in gin and tequila based cocktails, and they’re especially perfect for a bloody mary. Check out the video below for more inspiration! The Fourth Regiment is a classic cocktail that uses celery bitters in an interesting way.

The Fourth Regiment

1 oz rye whiskey
1 oz sweet vermouth
Aromatic bitters (1 to 2 dashes)
Orange bitters (1 to 2 dashes)
Celery bitters (1 to 2 dashes)
Lemon twist for garnish (optional)

Add liquid ingredients to a mixing glass with ice and stir until well chilled. If desired, express the lemon twist over a chilled coupe or cocktail glass. Garnish with lemon twist if using. Strain the cocktail into the glass and enjoy!

Fee Brothers’ Orgeat Syrup

Fee Brothers’ History:

In 1864, James Fee opened a grocery and liquor store in Rochester, NY to help support his large, close-knit family. His brothers helped him grow the store into a successful winery and wine import business. In 1883 the name was changed from James Fee & Company to Fee Brothers.

Surviving Prohibition: 

When prohibition began in 1920, Fee Brothers kept themselves afloat by making altar wine & distributing wine-making supplies. They even consulted with homeowners to legally make their own wine at home. It was legal to make a small amount of wine for personal use, but making and selling stronger spirits was strictly forbidden.

That didn’t stop people from trying though, and poor quality alcohol flooded the market. Most of the people making this black market booze had no clue what they were doing. For that reason, most of the alcohol being sold in saloons and speakeasies tasted terrible. Fee Brothers saw this as an opportunity and developed a line of cordial syrups and drink flavorings. They designed them to make inferior spirits taste like the real thing. Benedictine, Chartreuse, Brandy, and Rum flavorings were among their most popular products.

Cordial Syrups & Cocktail Bitters:

When prohibition ended in 1933, Fee Brothers started selling liquor again. They kept making their cordial syrups though, and they remained very popular. Therefore, they soon decided to focus on mixers, syrups, and flavorings instead. By 1950 they were on a never-ending quest to develop new products and their flavored cocktail bitters line really became a focus. Fee Brothers’ product list now boasts almost 100 drink mix products. Today they’re best know for their huge selection of flavored cocktail bitters.

Orgeat Sryup:

Orgeat syrup is traditionally made from almonds, sugar, and either rose water or orange flower water. It has a sweet almond flavor and is a very traditional ingredient in many cocktails and soda fountain drinks. Many classic tiki drinks call for Orgeat syrup, and it is an integral ingredient in the Mai Tai. Please watch the video below for another idea of how to put Fee’s Orgeat syrup to use in your home bar.

Bourbon Rootbeer Lift

1 1/2 oz. bourbon
1/2 oz. orgeat syrup
1/2 oz. heavy cream
1/2 oz. coffee liqueur
2 to 3 dashes rootbeer bitters
2 to 3 dashes vanilla extract
Soda water

Combine all ingredients, except the soda water, and shake with ice. Strain into a glass and gently stir while adding the soda to achieve a good froth. After it sits for 20 seconds or so add an ounce more soda water to lift the head above the glass. Serve with straw.